Welcome to the  Georgetown Festival of the Arts XIII 
May 27 - June 4, 2017


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Participants in the Festival, Great Britons in Georgetown, May 27-June 4, 2017
                                                                       
Artistic Director

Ellsworth Peterson 

is professor emeritus of music at Southwestern University. He holds an undergraduate degree from Southwestern University, a Master of Sacred Music degree from Union Theological Seminary, and a PhD from Harvard. He has been Artistic Director for all of the eleven previous Festivals of the Arts.


Speakers & Performers


Kirsten Peterson

is an adjunct instructor of music at the University of Connecticut-Stamford and Naugatuck Valley Community College. She received her doctorate in Music History and Theory from the University of Connecticut. Her research interests include nationalism and folk music influence in 19th- and 20th-century music She has given presentations at two earlier Georgetown Festivals of the Arts, discussing folk and nationalistic influences on the music of Dvořák and Brahms.

Lynn Parr Mock, soprano,

holds a BME degree from Southwestern University, where she studied with Virginia Dupuy, and MM degree from the University of Texas at Austin. She balances performing commitments with service on the boards of many fine arts organizations and is a co-founder of Lone Spring Arts in Dallas.

Dale Dietert, piano,

is a pianist, voice teacher and coach who has served on the faculties of the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies (Aldeburgh, England); the international institute of Vocal Arts (Tel Aviv, Israel); and the Sommerakademie Mozarteum (Salzburg, Austria).
He holds a BM in music literature and MM in piano performance from the University of Texas. He has been on the vocal faculties of the University of California at Santa Barbara and Texas State University, and is currently on the faculty of Southern Methodist University.

Hai Zheng, cello,

is Artist in Residence at Southwestern University. She has appeared in recital at the Shanghai Conservatory and New York City’s Steinway Hall, in master classes and recitals at Gungzhou and Macau Conservatories, and at a special invitation concert for the Hong Kong Asia Society, among many others.

Toby Blumenthal, piano,

has appeared as soloist with many ensembles, including the Chicago and Houston Symphony Orchestras. She is director of CHAMPS (Chamber Music in Public Schools) for Salon Concerts in Austin and Artistic Director and pianist for the Classic Chamber Concerts series. She has studied with Leonard Shure at the University of Texas and with Rudolf Serkin at the Marlboro Chamber Music Institute in Vermont.

Virginia Dupuy, mezzo-soprano,

is an alumna of Southwestern University and professor of music at Southern Methodist University. Her career in vocal performance and recording includes a Grammy nomination for her CD Voces Americanas with the Voices of Change ensemble. An Emily Dickinson scholar, she has recorded Dwell in Possibility: Emily Dickinson in Song. She has appeared with orchestras and opera companies across the US, and has been a performer in and supporter of the Festival of the Arts since its beginning.


David Polley, organ,

is a recently-retired music educator. Currently he is music director and organist at Grace Episcopal Church in Georgetown. He teaches organ students at Southwestern University. A native of Kansas, he has studied at Concordia University, Northwestern University and the University of Nebraska. He holds a DMA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has performed with high school, college, and community choirs in the United States, Europe and China.

Jessica Mathaes, violin,

enjoys a multifaceted career as a soloist, recording artist, educator and concertmaster. She has appeared as a soloist throughout the United States and internationally in Europe and Asia, and has been broadcast live on Performance Today, Chicago Public Radio, and ARTE, the French-German cultural television channel. She has been featured with numerous orchestras including the Austin, Victoria, Bismarck-Mandan, Round Rock, and Northwest Iowa Symphonies, and the Masterworks and National Music Festival Orchestras, and has given recitals on the Dame Myra Hess Series, the Artist Series of Sarasota, and at the University of Iowa, Texas Christian University, Texas Tech University, Northwestern College, Fredericksburg Music Club, Baylor University, the University of Houston, the University of Texas, the Organ Vesper Series, and the Tenri Cultural Institute in New York City. She is concertmaster of the Austin Symphony Orchestra.

Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano,

is Professor of Music and Associate Dean for the Sarofim School of Fine Arts at Southwestern University. He has performed as a soloist and collaborative pianist throughout North America, as well as in Europe and Asia. His latest orchestra appearances have been with the Austin Symphony Orchestra in performances of the Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503 by Mozart, with the Oahu Civic Orchestra, Honolulu, Hawaii and in May 2016 with the Temple Symphony in a performance of Mozart’s Concerto in E-flat major, K. 482. In 2015 he also completed a tour of Asia and a CD recording with Southwestern University faculty cellist Hai Zheng.

Steven Brennfleck, tenor,

has been consistently acknowledged for his consummate artistry, vocal flexibility,
and moving interpretations on the operatic and concert stage. He has collaborated with the
Alabama Symphony Orchestra, American Bach Soloists,
Handel Choir of Baltimore, Philadelphia Youth Orchestra, Princeton Baroque Orchestra,
LA International New Music Festival, June in Buffalo Festival,
Temple Symphony Orchestra, Westminster Festival Orchestra, and Princeton Pro Musica
in works such as Bach’s Mass in B Minor, Magnificat, and St. John Passion 
Britten’s Cantata Misericordium, Haydn’s Creation and  Missa St. Nicholas,
Mozart’s "Coronation" Mass, Mass in C minor, Requiem, and
Vesperae Solennes del Confessore, and Saint-Saën’s Christmas Oratorio.

Jacek Muzyk, French Horn,

was born and raised in Poland.  After graduation from the Academy of Music in Krakow, he completed
another masters degree at the Mannes College of Music in New York, and he received further education at the Juilliard School of Music and at Rice University in Houston (TX) .
Following his studies he returned to Poland, working full time with the best Polish orchestras. In 2002, Jacek Muzyk moved to the United States where he played with the Houston Grand Opera and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra before being appointed as Principal Horn with the Buffalo Philharmonic.


The Round Rock Symphony

is now in its eighth season as the only professional orchestra in Williamson County and has been under the leadership of Music Director Stefan Sanders since 2012. Its goal is to make the RRS a part of the cultural fabric of central Texas, expanding audiences through creative programming, appearances in a range of different venues, and increased educational offerings.

Stefan Sanders, conductor,

is Music Director and Conductor of the Round Rock Symphony. He also holds the Montante Family Endowed Associate Conductor Chair with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Juilliard School and Master and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to a career as a conductor, Mr. Sanders was an internationally know trombonist, performing as a soloist in the United States, Asia and Europe.

Vicki Pierce Stroeher

is a Professor of Music History at Marshall University where she also serves as Program Director of the School of Music.  She is co-editor with Nicholas Clark and Jude Brimmer of My Beloved Man: The Letters of Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears (Boydell Press, 2016). Dr. Stroeher is a graduate of Southwestern University with a Bachelor of Music in music history (1981).

Kevin Salfen

is Associate Professor of Music at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. He has degrees in composition and musicology from the University of North Texas. His work on Benjamin Britten has appeared in Music & Letters and 19th-Century Music, and his compositions have been performed in England, China, and throughout the U. S.

Bruce Cain, baritone, is Associate Professor of Music and director of the Opera Theatre at Southwestern University. He holds a BMus degree from McMurry University, MMus from Indiana University, and DMus from Northwestern University. He has performed concerts on five continents. He is conductor of the San Gabriel Chorale.

Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano,

is Professor of Music and Associate Dean for the Sarofim School of Fine Arts at Southwestern University. He has performed as a soloist and collaborative pianist throughout North America, as well as in Europe and Asia. His latest orchestra appearances have been with the Austin Symphony Orchestra in performances of the Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503 by Mozart, with the Oahu Civic Orchestra, Honolulu, Hawaii and in May 2016 with the Temple Symphony in a performance of Mozart’s Concerto in E-flat major, K. 482. In 2015 he also completed a tour of Asia and a CD recording with Southwestern University faculty cellist Hai Zheng.

John C. Schmidt, Organ

 is Professor of Music and teaches  musicology, music theory, and organ at Texas State University. He holds degrees from South­western Univer­sity, Union Theolog­ical Seminary, and New York University; as a musicologist he specializes in American music, particularly the 19th-century composer, John Knowles Paine.  Dr. Schmidt is a Trustee of the Sinfonian Educational Foundation and a member of the Governing Board of Inspiration Point Fine Arts Colony—Opera in the Ozarks.  He holds the FAGO certificate from the American Guild of Organists, and is a member of its Board of Examiners.  He is organist for Covenant Presbyterian Church in Austin.    


The San Gabriel Chorale

was founded in 1988 at Southwestern University by Dr. Kenny Sheppard as a “town and gown” outreach to offer people a chance to sing works from the rich a cappella and oratorio choral traditions that date from the 16th century up to the present. It contains about 75 singers, all volunteers who pay annual dues and buy their own copies of the music. They are mostly from Georgetown, including many from Sun City, but some live anywhere from North Austin to Killeen and Temple Dr. Bruce Cain of Southwestern has been conductor of the Chorale since 1998.

Kenny Sheppard, conductor,

is a professor in the Department of Music at Southwestern University and conductor of the University Chorale. Sine 1988 he has trained active choral conductors through the Conductor’s Institute, providing instruction and experience in conducting a chorus with orchestra. He has led the Festival Chorus and Orchestra for all of the Georgetown Festivals of the Arts.