​​

We regret to
announce that we must
POSTPONE
this year's Festival
until 2021, owing to
the Coronavirus 
pandemic.
The program will be the
same next year,

to the extent possible.
The dates and locations

have not yet
been determined.






Participants in the Festival  "Beethoven,"
​M
ay 24 - June 2, 2019
                                                                       


Ellsworth Peterson, Artistic Director, is professor emeritus of music at Southwestern University.  He holds an undergraduate degree from Southwestern University, a Master of Sacred Music degree from Union Theological Seminary, and a PhD from Harvard.  He has been Artistic Director for all of the previous Festivals of the Arts.  Festival composers have been Handel (2005); Haydn (2006); Schubert (2007); Mendelssohn (2008); Dvořák (2009); Copland (2010); Brahms (2011); Debussy, Ravel and Poulenc (2012); Tchaikovsky, Arensky and Rachmaninov (2013); and Albéniz, Granados, and Falla (2014); Robert and Clara Schumann (2015), Grieg, Sibelius and Nielsen (2016), Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Britten (2017) and Chávez, Villa-Lobos and Ginastera (2018) and Beethoven (2019).

Michael Cooper, lecturer, is the holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts at Southwestern University, His research interests include nineteenth-century music, source studies, historiography and political history.  His present research concerns the music of African American composers Florence Price (some of whose works he is editing for G. Schirmer) and Margaret Bonds (about whom he is currently working on a book).  Dr. Cooper received his PhD from Duke University and BM and MM degrees from Florida State University.   

Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano, is Professor of Music and Associate Dean for the Sarofim School of Fine Arts at Southwestern University. .  He has performed as a soloist and collaborative pianist in North America, Europe and Asia. His recent credits include a prize in the piano concerto category of the American Prize awards, and a book, Echoes from the East: The Javanese Gamelan and Its Influence on the Music of Claude Debussy
 
Hai Zheng, cellist, has made recordings as soloist with the English Chamber Orchestra in London and the Amatius Orchestra in New York at Lincoln Center.  She has performed as soloist with orchestras in Europe and  North America.  Her Asia concert tours have included recitals and master classes in Bangkok, Singapore, Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. In 2018 she was honored by Mayor Adler and the Austin City Council for her work the past eighteen years as Artistic Director for the Young Musicians Festival Competition.  She is Artist in Residence at Southwestern University and is also on the faculty of St. Stephen’s School.

Virginia Dupuy, mezzo-soprano, is an alumna of Southwestern University and Professor of Music at Southern Methodist University.   An Emily Dickinson scholar, she has recorded Dwell in Possibility:  Emily Dickinson in Song.  She has appeared with orchestras and opera companies across the US, and has been a performer in and supporter of the Festival of the Arts since its beginning.

Catharine Lysinger, pianist, has won prizes in national and international piano competitions. She has performed with orchestras in the United States and Mexico and frequently collaborates with the Meadows Wind Ensemble and Voices of Change, a Dallas-based ensemble that features chamber music written by living composers.  She holds a BM degree from Southwestern University and MM and DMA degrees from the University of Houston.  She is a member of the music faculty at SMU.

Lara Downes, pianist, is a self-described iconoclast who has pursued original programming concepts both in concert and on recordings. Born in San Francisco, Lara studied at the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna, the Mozarteum in Salzburg, the Paris Conservatory and the Music Academy of Basel, before returning to the USA to teach at the University of California at Davis.  Her recordings have thematic programs that cross national, ethnic and gender boundaries.  Her latest CD is “Some of These Days,” is “a multi-genre collection of African American Spirituals and soliloquies.”  Copies will be given as a gift to those who attend her Festival Symposium/Recital on Saturday, June 6.
 
The Invoke String Quartet cultivates a sound borrowing from bluegrass, Appalachian fiddle tunes, jazz and minimalism to create a contemporary string quartet repertoire.  It has been Young Professional String Quartet in Residence at the University of Texas (2016-2018), Artists in Residence at Strathmore, the Emerging Young Artist Quartet at Interlochen, and the Fellowship String Quartet at Wintergreen Performing Arts in Virginia.  Their 2015 CD, Souls in the Mud, features original works composed by and for them.

Lynn Parr Mock, soprano, holds a BME degree from Southwestern University, where she studied with Virginia Dupuy, and MM degree from the University of Texas at Austin.  She balances performing commitments with service on the boards of many fine arts organizations and is a co-founder of Lone Spring Arts in Dallas.  She is a member of Southwestern University’s Board of Trustees.

Bruce Cain, baritone, is Associate Professor of Music and director of the Opera Theatre at Southwestern University.  He holds a BMus degree from McMurry University, MMus from Indiana University, and DMus from Northwestern University.  He has performed concerts on five continents.  He is conductor of the San Gabriel Chorale.

Ian Davidson, oboe, has appeared as soloist and chamber musician on six continents during forty-three international concert tours.  He is Solo English Horn and Associate Principal Oboe of the Austin Symphony Orchestra, and Principal Oboe of the Austin Opera Orchestra. He holds degrees from De Pauw University and the University of Texas.  He serves as Regents’ and University Distinguished Professor at Texas State University.

Toby Blumenthal, piano, has been a soloist with ensembles including the Chicago and Houston Symphony Orchestras.  She has studied with Leonard Shure at the University of Texas and with Rudolf Serkin at the Marlboro Chamber Music Institute in Vermont.  She is Director of CHAMPS (Chamber Music in Public Schools), Director of Salon Concerts of Austin, and is Artistic Director and pianist for Classic Chamber Concerts.  .  She has played for every Festival of the Arts since 2011.

Megan Meisenbach, flutist, won first prize in the National Flute Association’s Chamber Music Competition.  She has repeatedly been given touring grants from the Mid-America Arts Alliance and the Texas Commission on the Arts.  Her performances include works from the standard repertoire as well as premieres of works by Robert Xavier Rodriguez, David Amram, Robert Avalon and Charles Rochester Young.  She has studied with Jean-Pierre Rampal and James Galway and holds the MM degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

Kevin Bryant, tenor, is a member of Tri-Cities Opera in Binghamton, New York.  A native of Georgetown, he received his BM in vocal performance from Southwestern University, where he was also a student intern for the Georgetown Festival of the Arts.  He holds an MM from the Eastman School of Music, following which he joined Wolf Trap Opera in Washington DC as a Studio Artist.

Pamela Rossman, piano, has recently retired from the music faculty of Southwestern University, where she taught piano lessons, accompanied the University Chorale and was organist and coordinator of chapel music.  She holds the BM degree from Southwestern and the MM degree in choral conducting from the University of Texas at Austin.

David Polley, organist, is a retired music educator.  He is organist at Grace Episcopal Church in Georgetown and organ instructor at Southwestern University.  A native of Kansas, he studied at Concordia University and Northwestern University and holds a DMA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  He has performed with high school, college and community choirs in the United States, Europe and China.

DaShawn Williams, counter-tenor, is an undergraduate student at the University of Michigan.  While a student at Georgetown High School, he studied voice with Southwestern University faculty member Dana Zenobi.  In Michigan he has studied with George Shirley..

Kenny Sheppard, conductor, is a professor emeritus in the Department of Music at Southwestern University where he led the University Chorale.  From 1988 until his retirement he trained active choral conductors through the Conductor’s Institute of Southwestern University. The program provided both instruction and experience in conducting a chorus with orchestra.  He has led the Festival Chorus and Orchestra for each of the Georgetown Festivals of the Arts.

San Gabriel Chorale was founded in 1988 at Southwestern University by Dr. Kenny Sheppard as a “town and gown” outreach to offer people a chance to sing works from the rich a cappella and oratorio choral traditions that date from the sixteenth century up to the present.  Membership stands at about 75 singers, all volunteers who pay annual dues and buy their own copies of the music.  Most are from Georgetown, including many from Sun City, but some live anywhere from North Austin to Killeen and Temple. Dr. Bruce Cain of Southwestern University has been conductor of the Chorale since 1998.


Kirsten Peterson is an adjunct instructor of music at the University of Connecticut-Stamford and Naugatuck Valley Community College.  She received her doctorate in Music History and Theory from the University of Connecticut and holds a master’s in bassoon performance from Yale University.  Her research interests include nationalism and folk music influence in 19th- and 20th-century music She has given presentations at three earlier Georgetown Festivals of the Arts, discussing folk and nationalistic influences on the music of Dvořák, Brahms and Vaughan Williams.  She is principal bassoonist with the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra in Connecticut.

Kathryn Mishell, lecturer and composer, has long been a champion of women composers.  For ten years she was radio host of KMFA’s Into the Light, a weekly program featuring the music of women composers; the series won several awards, including three Gracie Awards for outstanding work in biography for public radio.  She is Artistic Director of Salon Concerts, which presents chamber musicians in concerts in intimate settings.  Its educational arm is CHAMPS, dedicated to the promotion of the playing and teaching of chamber music in the public schools.

William E. Nicholas, lecturer, is Professor emeritus of Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama where he taught for forty years. His teaching fields included recent United States history and Latin American history; he has written many articles on American Civil Rights history.  His book Go and be Reconciled:  Alabama Methodists Confront Racial Injustice, 1954-1974 was published in 2018. He is an amateur pianist and has been an avid opera goer since age twelve.  He moved to Georgetown in 2013 and currently teaches an opera seminar in Sun City, focusing on the Metropolitan Opera HD broadcasts

Jessica Mathaes, violin, enjoys a career as a soloist, recording artist, educator and concertmaster. She has appeared as a soloist throughout the United States, Europe and Asia, and has been broadcast live on Performance Today, Chicago Public Radio, and ARTE, the French-German cultural television channel. She has been featured with orchestras throughout the United States.  She is concertmaster of the Austin Symphony Orchestra.

Stephen Girko, clarinet, was born in New York City.  He holds the MM degree from the Manhattan School of Music and BS in music education from the State University College of New York at Potsdam.  Presently principal clarinetist with the Austin Symphony Orchestra, he earlier served in that capacity with the Dallas and San Antonio Symphony Orchestras.  He has taught at Oklahoma University and SMU and is presently on the faculty of San Antonio College, Our Lady of the Lake University, The University of the Incarnate Word and Saint Mary’s University.

Donnie Ray Albert, baritone, has sung in concert and in major operatic roles in Chicago, New York City, Houston, Dallas, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and many other cities.  He has served as a resident artist with the Center for Black Music Research at Chicago’s Columbia College.  He sang at President Carter’s inauguration.  His recordings include the Grammy award-winning Porgy and Bess with the Houston Grand Opera.  He was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and holds a BM from Louisiana State University and MM from SMU.   He is on the faculty of the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas at Austin.

Miguel Campinho, piano, a native of Portugal, is currently Assistant Professor of Collaborative Piano in the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas in Austin.  He was previously a collaborative pianist at the Yale Opera and at The Hartt School (from which he holds an Artist Diploma, MM and DMA degrees). His doctoral dissertation is a study of the life and piano music of the Portuguese composer Óscar da Silva.

Michelle Cann, piano, has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Cleveland Institute of Music Symphony Orchestra, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and  Florida Orchestra.  She has appeared in recital and as a chamber musician in the USA, China and South Korea.  She has appeared as co-host/collaborative pianist for NPR’s From the Top.  She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in piano performance from the Cleveland Institute of Music. She is currently on staff at the Curtis School of Music and the Luzerne Music Center in New York.

Adrienne Inglis, flautist, has a Bachelor of Music degree in Flute from Lewis and Clark College and Master of Music from the University of Texas at Austin.  She teaches flute at Southwestern University and is principal flute of the Central Texas Philharmonic.  She is a founding member of the ensemble Chaski, which presents classical, Celtic and Latin American folk music featuring all kinds of flutes and harps.

Alegria Arce, pianist, has performed with the New York Philharmonic, the Boston, Detroit and Houston Symphony Orchestras, and at the Casals Festival in Zermatt, Switzerland.  She is a prize winner of the Leventritt International Competition of New York and the Oakland Symphony International Solo Competition.  She studied with Vladimir Ashkenazy and Leon Fleisher.

Stefan Sanders, conductor, is Music Director and Conductor of the Central Texas Philharmonic.  He is also Music Director of the Fayettville (NC) Symphony Orchestra and the Spartanburg (SC) Philharmonic and serves as a cover/assistant conductor for the New York Philharmonic.  He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Juilliard School and Master and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from the University of Texas at Austin.  Prior to a career as a conductor, Mr. Sanders was an internationally-known trombonist, performing as a soloist in the United States, Asia and Europe.

The Central Texas Philharmonic was founded in 2008 as The Round Rock Symphony.  It was re-named in 2019 through a merger of its Board with the Georgetown Symphony Society.  This new musical entity envisions a future rooted in the purpose of connecting people through music.  In addition to performing subscription concerts at the Klett Center in Georgetown, it  serves as the resident orchestra for the Butler opera International Competition, the Texas State International Piano Festival, and the Georgetown Festival of the Arts.
 


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Participants in the Festival  "!Saludos!"," May 18 - 27, 2018
                                                                       
Artistic Director

Ellsworth Peterson , Artistic Director,

is professor emeritus of music at Southwestern University.  He holds an undergraduate degree from Southwestern University, a Master of Sacred Music degree from Union Theological Seminary, and a PhD from Harvard.  He has been Artistic Director for all of the thirteen previous Festivals of the Arts.  Festival composers have been Handel (2005); Haydn (2006); Schubert (2007); Mendelssohn (2008); Dvořák (2009); Copland (2010); Brahms (2011); Debussy, Ravel and Poulenc (2012); Tchaikovsky, Arensky and Rachmaninov (2013); and Albéniz, Granados, and Falla (2014); Robert and Clara Schumann (2015), Grieg, Sibelius and Nielsen (2016) and Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Britten (2017).    


Speakers & Performers

   
William E. Nicholas, speaker, 

is a retired professor of American and Latin American history.  He taught for forty years at Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama. His avocations include Spanish study, piano, and travel.  He lives in Georgetown.
    
   
Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano,

is Professor of Music and Associate Dean for the Sarofim School of Fine Arts at Southwestern University.  He has performed as a soloist and collaborative pianist throughout North America, as well as in Europe and Asia. His latest orchestra appearances have been with the Austin Symphony Orchestra in performances of the Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503 by Mozart, with the Oahu Civic Orchestra, Honolulu, Hawaii and in May 2016 with the Temple Symphony in a performance of Mozart’s Concerto in E-flat major, K. 482.  In 2015 he also completed a tour of Asia and a CD recording with Southwestern University faculty cellist Hai Zheng.
    
   
Virginia Dupuy, mezzo-soprano,

is an alumna of Southwestern University and professor of music at Southern Methodist University.  Her career in vocal performance and recording includes a Grammy nomination for her CD Voces Americanas with the Voices of Change ensemble.  An Emily Dickinson scholar, she has recorded Dwell in Possibility:  Emily Dickinson in Song.  She has appeared with orchestras and opera companies across the US, and has been a performer in and supporter of the Festival of the Arts since its beginning.
    
   
Hai Zheng, cello,

is Artist in Residence at Southwestern University.  She has appeared in recital at the Shanghai Conservatory and New York City’s Steinway Hall, in master classes and recitals at Gungzhou and Macau Conservatories, and at a special invitation concert for the Hong Kong Asia Society, among many others.
    

Lynn Parr Mock, soprano,

holds a BME degree from Southwestern University, where she studied with Virginia Dupuy, and MM degree from the University of Texas at Austin. She balances performing commitments with service on the boards of many fine arts organizations and is a co-founder of Lone Spring Arts in Dallas.

   
Invoke string quartet

Bowed and fretted string quartet invoke dodges genre classification. Their sound
borrows from American traditions including bluegrass, Appalachian fiddle tunes,
jazz, and minimalism. a contemporary string quartet repertoire written by and for
the group. Invoke has been Young Professional String Quartet in Residence at UT
(2016 e 2018), Artists in Residence at Strathmore, Emerging Young Artist Quartet at
Interlochen, and Fellowship String Quartet at Wintergreen Performing Arts.

 
Austin Bella Corda guitar ensemble is comprised of outstanding pre-college guitarists, all who emerged from the Childbloom® Guitar Programs of Central Texas.  

The Austin Bella Corda guitar ensemble 2017/18 members are Olivia Bannister, Aytahn Benavi, Elyce Garcia, Kabeer Motwani, Noah Kentros, Simon Krauskopf, Linden Meyer, Elle Smith.  

Kevin Taylor is Artistic Director of The Young Performing Artist Program and 
Director of Austin Bella Corda Guitar Ensemble. 

 
   
The Round Rock Symphony

is now in its ninth season as the only professional orchestra in Williamson County and has been under the leadership of Music Director Stefan Sanders since 2012.  Its goal is to make the RRS a part of the cultural fabric of central Texas, expanding audiences through creative programming, appearances in a range of different venues, and increased educational offerings.

Stefan Sanders, conductor,

is Music Director and Conductor of the Round Rock Symphony.  He also holds the Montante Family Endowed Associate Conductor Chair with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra.  He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Juilliard School and Master and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from the University of Texas at Austin.  Prior to a career as a conductor, Mr. Sanders was an internationally know trombonist, performing as a soloist in the United States, Asia and Europe.

Fabián López, violin,

has toured extensively through the United States, Europe and South America, gaining recognition as a soloist, chamber musician, and teacher. As soloist he has performed with orchestras in the United States, Spain, and France.  Fabián is currently the first violinist of the Carlos Chavez String Quartet. In North Carolina he has appeared as concertmaster of the Greensboro and Ashville Symphonies.

Bruce Cain, baritone,

is Associate Professor of Music and director of the Opera Theatre at Southwestern University.  He holds a BMus degree from McMurry University, MMus from Indiana University, and DMus from Northwestern University.  He has performed concerts on five continents.  He is conductor of the San Gabriel Chorale.

David Asbury, guitarist,

is an active performer, teacher, scholar and adjudicator who has appeared on concert stages in Europe, Canada, Central America and throughout the United States. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Diploma of Merit from the Academia Chigiana in Siena, Italy. He has served on the faculty of Southwestern University since 1992. His studies with renowned pedagogue Aaron Shearer led to a Bachelor of Music degree from the North Carolina School of the Arts. He received his Master and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from the University of Texas at Austin where he worked under the direction of Adam Holzman.


Adrienne Inglis, flute,

performs, records and tours with the flute and harp ensemble Chaski.   She also plays principal flute with the Round Rock Symphony, Panoramic Voices and Chorus Austin.  She teaches flute and coaches the Flute Ensemble and Andean Ensemble at Southwestern University.  


David Utterback, piano,

is an active collaborative and solo pianist in the Austin area. Performing most often as a vocal accompanist, he is involved in a wide variety of musical endeavors including chamber music, opera, cabaret, and musical theater. He is a member of the Austin Chamber Ensemble, and also is the accompanist for the choirs of Chorus Austin (Austin Civic Chorus and Austin Vocal Arts Ensemble). He has held his current appointment as a member of the piano faculty at Southwestern University since 1993.

Kirsten Peterson, speaker and bassoonist,

is an adjunct instructor of music at the University of Connecticut-Stamford and Naugatuck Valley Community College.  She received her doctorate in Music History and Theory from the University of Connecticut.  Her research interests include nationalism and folk music influence in 19th- and 20th-century music She has given presentations at three earlier Georgetown Festivals of the Arts, discussing folk and nationalistic influences on the music of Dvořák, Brahms and Vaughan Williams.  She is principal bassoonist with the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra in Connecticut.

Carol A. Hess,

a professor at the University of California at Davis, has published several books and articles on the music of Spain and the Americas.  In 2004, she published Sacred Passions: The Life and Music of Manuel de Falla (Oxford University Press). Her most recent book, Representing the Good Neighbor: Music, Difference, and the Pan American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013), explores the reception of Latin American concert music in the United States and also received the American Musicological Society’s Robert M. Stevenson Prize. Dr. Hess was a lecturer at the 2014 Georgetown Festival of the Arts featuring t